Hanging On: COVID Gave Louisiana’s Addiction Patients Life-Saving Drug Treatment By Phone

Julie Kerry spent two decades in pain before doctors diagnosed her with breast cancer in 2019. The pain had started with fibromyalgia and scar tissue on her brain from a seizure-inducing condition called mesial temporal sclerosis. Relief was easy to come by — a former partner saw to that. Four years later, she was buying hydrocodone on the street. But after years of harboring a corrosive shame about her addiction, she finally had enough. Seeing the wonders treatment worked on her daughter’s addiction, Julie got help.

Read More

NPR News

Black And Latino Voters Flooded With Disinformation In Election's Final Days

Murphy Bannerman first noticed the posts this summer in a Facebook group called Being Black in Arizona. Someone started posting memes full of false claims that seemed designed to discourage people from voting. The memes were "trying to push this narrative of, 'The system is a mess and there's no point in you participating,' " Bannerman said. She recalled statements such as, " 'Democrats and Republicans are the same. There's no point in voting.' 'Obama didn't do anything for you during his...

Read More

Julie Kerry spent two decades in pain before doctors diagnosed her with breast cancer in 2019. The pain had started with fibromyalgia and scar tissue on her brain from a seizure-inducing condition called mesial temporal sclerosis. Relief was easy to come by — a former partner saw to that. Four years later, she was buying hydrocodone on the street. But after years of harboring a corrosive shame about her addiction, she finally had enough. Seeing the wonders treatment worked on her daughter’s addiction, Julie got help.

A few thousand more homes had their power restored Friday in Southeast Louisiana. But around 309,000 remain in the dark.

Aubri Juhasz / WWNO

State officials are working to determine how many polling places may have been affected by Hurricane Zeta. With hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses in Southeast Louisiana without power, many fear that any last-minute closures will compound voter confusion ahead of election day.

Hundreds of thousands are without power Thursday after Hurricane Zeta tore through Southeast Louisiana, and some may have to wait 10 days to get it back.

Hundreds of thousands of Louisianans are without power and dealing with wind damage from Hurricane Zeta on Thursday morning. One person in Louisiana is dead.

Paul Braun / WRKF

Gov. John Bel Edwards vetoed a bill Tuesday that would have expanded the legislature’s power to shape the state’s coronavirus response by stripping individual coronavirus restrictions put in place by the governor.

Sue Lincoln / WRKF

The superintendent of the Louisiana State Police will retire at the end of the month, Gov. John Bel Edwards announced Tuesday.

Paul Braun / WRKF

Gov. John Bel Edwards is asking a Louisiana judge to weigh in on Republican state lawmakers’ latest effort to strip his public health emergency declaration and all the coronavirus restrictions that go with it.

He sounded like a grandfather, but he had no grandkids. His voice, gruff and hardened from years living on and off the street, softened as they got to know each other. Him, a divorced, homeless father we’ll call John, with throbbing leg pains, calling from a motel room near the airport in Lafayette. Her, Donia H., a young woman of Iranian descent, calling from her parents’ house outside Atlanta. His leg pain sounded like complications from diabetes. And diabetes killed her uncle.

As the country battles a third wave of COVID-19 cases, Louisiana has managed to keep its number of new infections relatively low. But with cases on the rise in neighboring Texas and Mississippi and in the northwestern corner of the state, Assistant Secretary of Public Health Dr. Joseph Kanter is worried that there could be another spike.

Pages

A Susan Stam-bag for NPR fans

NPR "founding mother" Susan Stamberg is pictured on this zipper tote and her cranberry relish recipe is printed inside! Choose it as a thank you gift when you donate $12.50 per month or more.

LSU Science Cafe: How to Live Better. Tuesday, October 27 at 6 p.m.

Learn how to eat better and move more to prevent cancer and how exercise can help keep you mentally healthy and prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

Need a tax receipt? Sign up for MyWRKF, your Online Member Portal!

Sign up to manage your WRKF member account at your convenience with MyWRKF. Update your contact information, change your payment method, print your tax receipt and so much more.