Feds Launch Sex Abuse Investigation Of Pennsylvania's Roman Catholic Church

The Department of Justice has launched an investigation of child sex abuse within Pennsylvania's Roman Catholic Church, sending subpoenas to dioceses across the state seeking private files and records to explore the possibility that priests and bishops violated federal law in cases that go back decades, NPR has learned. In what is thought to be the first such inquiry into the church's clergy sex abuse scandal, authorities have issued subpoenas to look into possible violations of the federal...

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StarKist Pleads Guilty To Price Fixing In Alleged Collusion In Canned Tuna Industry

Updated at 12:56 p.m. ET StarKist Co. has reportedly agreed to plead guilty to charges of price fixing as part of a conspiracy with two of its competitors to keep the price of canned tuna high. Federal prosecutors announced the plea agreement on Thursday, which includes a fine of up to $100 million, according to The Associated Press. In the same deal, a former StarKist executive and two former Bumble Bee Foods executives pleaded guilty to price fixing. StarKist's plea comes amid a government...

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Trump Administration tariffs on things like steel and aluminum have been hard on ports across the country. But  officials at the Port of New Orleans say diversification has kept it in strong financial shape.

JESSICA ROSGAARD / WWNO

State officials have called the duplication of benefits penalty one of the biggest hurdles to recovery from the 2016 floods. Thousands of Louisiana homeowners who flooded more than two years ago took out Small Business Administration loans to help pay for the damage, but doing so made accessing recovery grants from the state nearly impossible. 

LSU AgCenter

Looking up in your pecan or sweet gum trees, you may have noticed a very spooky webbing being formed around the tips of your branches, as well as the foliation under the webbing.

If you are seeing this, most likely you have an infestation of the fall webworm.

The goal of the 2016 Paris Climate agreement is to limit global warming to less than two degrees celsius above pre-industrial levels. While President Trump has announced his intentions to pull out of the agreement, other nations, cities, and researchers are still working toward that goal.

This week, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a report showing what will happen if the earth warms more than 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels (we’re already at about 1°C). The outlook is dire.

For this week’s coastal news roundup, WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with one of the report’s authors, Bill Solecki, professor of Geography at Hunter College in New York.

On Wednesday, congress passed America's Water Infrastructure Act of 2018, which could encourage the Army Corps of Engineers to build more green infrastructure.

Infrastructure bills are fairly routine. Generally passed every couple years, they often approve lists of projects for things like river dredging or levees -- projects that the Corps builds.

New this year: a section that requires the Corps to consider “natural or nature-based” projects as alternatives if it wants to build something.

LSU AgCenter

Cannas are highly versatile plants and should be used in the landscape by anyone looking to add a tropical feel to the garden or simply looking for a beautiful filler that provides tons of color all throughout the summer. Cannas can tolerate a wide variety of soil moistures ranging from very soggy to fairly dry. This particular quality of Cannas makes it an ideal candidate for rain gardens and low lying areas of the garden.

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After more than two years of an economic slump in Louisiana, a recent report published by the LSU Economics and Policy Research Group shows the number of jobs in Louisiana could reach record numbers by 2020. 

LSU AgCenter

September and October is an excellent time to plant the sunflower. You can plant them this time of year for a beautiful fall bouquet.

You might have noticed that sunflowers are not usually sold as transplants. This is because sunflowers are fairly difficult to transfer from pot to garden.

Louisiana shrimpers are facing low prices. They say the business is tougher than it’s ever been, and recently considered striking. Many are looking for creative ways to make more money.

 

Jennifer Martin / Wikimedia Commons CCA 4.0

It’s been three years since the Louisiana Legislature approved medical marijuana as a treatment option for certain health conditions. The drug is expected to become available to patients this year, and the number of people who could qualify has grown to about 100,000, after the Legislature expanded the program to include medical conditions like chronic pain and PTSD. 

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The Definitive Guide to the 2018 Midterms

A one-hour roundtable from the people of NPR's Politics Podcast