Aubri Juhasz

Aubri Juhasz is the education reporter for New Orleans Public Radio. Before coming to New Orleans, she was a producer for National Public Radio’s All Things Considered. She helped lead the show's technology and book coverage and reported her own feature stories, including the surge in cycling deaths in New York City and the decision by some states to offer competitive video gaming to high school students as an extracurricular activity.

She grew up on Long Island and holds a bachelor's degree in English and political science from Barnard College, Columbia University.

It’s been 60 years since four New Orleans first-graders walked through the doors of two all-white elementary schools. Ruby Bridges, Leona Tate, Tessie Prevost and Gail Etienne became young Civil Rights leaders in a new push for school integration in the Deep South.

Louisiana’s 5th Congressional District will advance to a general election after no candidate received the majority of the primary vote. Republicans Luke Letlow and Lance Harris, the race’s top two vote-getters, will be on the ballot in December.

Hundreds of thousands of Louisianans are without power and dealing with wind damage from Hurricane Zeta on Thursday morning. One person in Louisiana is dead.

Tulane University announced Friday that students will be allowed to return for in-person classes this spring, but will still be subject to regular COVID-19 testing in a continued effort to control the spread of the virus.

As New Orleans public schools continue its slow return to in-person learning, bringing middle and high school students back to the classroom starting Monday, about 40 percent of students have opted to keep learning at home, according to the district.

When New Orleans’ public schools welcomed students in PreK through fourth grade back to the classroom last month, 38 percent decided to keep learning from home. That’s created new challenges for teachers who in some cases must now teach in-person and remote students at the same time.

School administrators were optimistic that a quick pivot to online learning could rescue the start of the school year in Southwest Louisiana, where Hurricane Laura hit late last month. Now, the region’s largest district has announced that virtual learning will be optional, citing a lack of internet access.

It’s less than 30 seconds long but packs an unbridled shot of optimism. First, there’s a trilling flute and then a fourth-grade student lays down the tracks.

Update: Classes are canceled Tuesday due to Hurricane Sally, NOLA-PS announced Monday afternoon. All school buildings and the district’s central office will be closed.

Tropical Storm Sally is expected to make landfall Tuesday along the north-central Gulf Coast as a Category 1 Hurricane, according to the National Weather Service. Hurricane and storm surge watches have been issued for Orleans Parish and other portions of the northern Gulf Coast.

Pages