Aubri Juhasz

Aubri Juhasz is the education reporter for New Orleans Public Radio. Before coming to New Orleans, she was a producer for National Public Radio’s All Things Considered. She helped lead the show's technology and book coverage and reported her own feature stories, including the surge in cycling deaths in New York City and the decision by some states to offer competitive video gaming to high school students as an extracurricular activity.

She grew up on Long Island and holds a bachelor's degree in English and political science from Barnard College, Columbia University.

School administrators were optimistic that a quick pivot to online learning could rescue the start of the school year in Southwest Louisiana, where Hurricane Laura hit late last month. Now, the region’s largest district has announced that virtual learning will be optional, citing a lack of internet access.

It’s less than 30 seconds long but packs an unbridled shot of optimism. First, there’s a trilling flute and then a fourth-grade student lays down the tracks.

Update: Classes are canceled Tuesday due to Hurricane Sally, NOLA-PS announced Monday afternoon. All school buildings and the district’s central office will be closed.

Tropical Storm Sally is expected to make landfall Tuesday along the north-central Gulf Coast as a Category 1 Hurricane, according to the National Weather Service. Hurricane and storm surge watches have been issued for Orleans Parish and other portions of the northern Gulf Coast.

New Orleans will remain in Phase 2 of its coronavirus reopening as the rest of the state moves to Phase 3 on Friday under Gov. John Bel Edwards' order.

Like many districts across the country, Calcasieu Parish and Cameron Parish will start the school year entirely online. Unlike other districts, their decision has nothing to do with COVID-19.

Tulane students have been back on campus for almost four weeks. In that time, there’s been a marked increase in the number of asymptomatic COVID-19 cases among undergraduate students, according to the university’s Office of Campus Health.

Schools are now required to report known and suspected cases of COVID-19 to the Louisiana Department of Health as part of an “early warning system,” according to an emergency order from State Health Officer Jimmy Guidry.

New Orleans’ youngest public school students will return to the classroom full-time starting in mid-September, the district announced late last week. Older students will continue to learn virtually until at least mid-October.

The front wall of Hair Saga Beauty Supply in Lake Charles, Louisiana, used to be covered with hundreds of expensive wigs. Now, it’s lying flat in the store’s parking lot, ripped from the building by Hurricane Laura’s 150 mph winds.

Pages