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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

The TV show "Love Life" starts with some data.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "LOVE LIFE")

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

You've been telling us about the songs that are getting you through this stressful time. For Cara Robertson (ph) of Santa Monica, Calif., it's Nina Simone's cover of the 1970 hit "O-o-h Child."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "O-O-H CHILD")

Widespread protests across the nation have followed several high-profile deaths of African Americans in recent weeks, including George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor, as well as allegations of racial profiling,

Earlier in this pandemic, the shortage of tests for the coronavirus was a major problem in fighting the spread of COVID-19. The shortage was such that many hospitals and clinics would test only someone who had traveled to a country with an outbreak, had a known exposure to a positive case or showed symptoms of the disease.

But access to tests has improved significantly, and in some places, people can now get tested without having to show any symptoms at all. So if you can get tested, should you?

Weeks before the 2018 midterm, President Trump stood before a packed arena in Council Bluffs, Iowa, and singled out Rep. Steve King — then running for his ninth term.

"[King] may be the world's most conservative human being," Trump said to a crowd of cheering supporters.

In Navajo culture to speak of death is taboo. But since the tribe's coronavirus infection rate has become the highest in the country, they can't help but talk about it.

"It's killing every day," says medicine man Ty Davis, who knows at least five traditional practitioners who have died from COVID-19.

Updated at 12:29 p.m.

Police and demonstrators clashed in dozens of cities across the U.S. on Saturday during another night of protests in response to the death of George Floyd.

See You In Food Court

May 30, 2020

On this week's show, Louisiana Eats looks at the place where the law intersects with food and drink. The topic's not as dry as you might expect—especially when it comes to liquor and law!

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally today, we want to leave you on a high note - literally. We're talking about the new movie, "The High Note," which tells the story of a classic diva with all the amazing clothes, fabulous houses and luxe parties. But it also tells the story about the assistant in the background handing her tissues and green juice, handling her messes and bucking up all those insecurities that the rest of the world does not see.

How Police Training Has Evolved

May 30, 2020

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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