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Pearson Cross

Louisiana Public Broadcasting

Five weeks separate the gubernatorial primary and runoff in the race for Louisiana governor and this week marks the halfway point. Primary voters whittled down the field to two candidates—Republican businessman Eddie Rispone and the incumbent, Democrat John Bel Edwards.

The top-three candidates met in televised debates three times ahead of the primary and a few more times in candidate forums around the state. But that hasn't been the case in the runoff.

On Wednesday, Edwards and Rispone will meet face-to-face in the first, and likely only, debate before voters head to the polls November 16th.

Pearson Cross, political science professor and the Associate Dean of the University of Louisiana, Lafayette College of Liberal Arts, previews the showdown.

Aurianna Cordero / LSU Reveille

Gov. John Bel Edwards, Congressman Ralph Abraham and Baton Rouge business man Eddie Rispone faced off last week for the first of three televised debates ahead of the October 12th election.

In a race that's largely been contested through TV ads and press releases, the appearance marked the first time the three candidates met face-to-face to discuss the issues and take jabs at each other.

The Louisiana legislature debated a total of seven bills dealing with the issue of abortion during its 2019 session. The bill that got the most attention would make abortion illegal after about six weeks — before many women know they’re pregnant.

SARAH GAMARD/LSU MANSHIP SCHOOL NEWS SERVICE

With the 2019 legislative session wrapped up and a campaign for re-election on the horizon, Governor John Bel Edwards took stock of the successes and failures of his key initiatives. 

Wallis Watkins

Starting today, the Louisiana Legislature will spend two months crafting a budget and debating legislation. At the same time, plenty of focus will be fixed months down the road on October elections.

JESSICA ROSGAARD / WWNO

Primary elections work differently in Louisiana than most other states. In Louisiana's jungle primary system, all candidates - no matter their party - compete against each other. If no one gets more than 50 percent of the vote, the top two finishers move on to a run off, even if they both belong to the same political party. 

Wallis Watkins

Another special session is underway at the Capitol. But on Tuesday, Gov. John Bel Edwards broke tradition and didn’t address the legislature to open the session. Instead, he left the Capitol and spoke with elected officials and supporters at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Sarah Gamard/LSU Manship School News Service

Increasing the minimum wage, expanding equal pay for women, strengthening policies against sexual harassment — these are all goals Gov. John Bel Edwards wanted to achieve in the regular session. But last week, all three policies hit a wall. 

Edwards campaign: Schroder campaign

Less than 14-percent of Louisiana’s three million registered voters cast ballots in Saturday’s statewide election, but they sent the Treasurer’s race to a runoff next month between Democrat Derrick Edwards and Republican John Schroder.


Senate Race Remains A Toss-Up

Nov 8, 2016
LPB

Which two candidates will come out on top of today’s voting and make the U.S. Senate runoff December 10th?

“Most people assume that it will be one Republican and one Democrat,” says U-L Lafayette political science professor Pearson Cross.


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