WRKF

Louisiana history

Kathleen Babineaux Blanco: a carpet cleaner’s daughter from New Iberia turned school teacher turned stay-at-home mom turned…Louisiana's first female governor. In 2003, her focus was on education reform, juvenile justice, and economic development. And halfway into her first and only term, it looked like she had a good chance at re-election. But that all changed, with Hurricane Katrina. 

Keith Plessy, descendant of the man who tested Louisiana law requiring separate railroad cars, discusses how he came together with Pheobe Ferguson, the great-great granddaughter of the judge who upheld the law.


William O'Connor, senior writer for the Daily Beast, talks about the enduring legacy of Huey Long on the landscape of Baton Rouge. O'Connor's feature about the Old Governor's Mansion and its remarkable past is "Strippers, Insane Asylums, Assassination and Termites: Inside the Insane History of the World's Greatest White House Replica."


Business vs. Labor: A Louisiana History Lesson

Mar 15, 2017
McNeese State University library

How has business grown so influential in state politics? As the legislature prepares to debate issues like tax reform and equal pay -- which often pit businesses against workers and other individuals -- it’s time for a history lesson.


Setting the Scene for the Session

Apr 10, 2015

Participants in the legislative process can easily get sucked into the intensity of a session. BUT Louisiana lawmaking does not take place in a vacuum. It happens in the tallest state capitol building in the United States—a place filled with symbolism.

Built in the first few years of the Great Depression, it was the brainchild of then-Governor Huey P. Long.

“He completed it in just 14 months’ time, at the cost of five million dollars,” explains Capitol tour guide Audrey Fry.