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lawn care

Don't Be Your Tree's Worst Enemy

Aug 9, 2019
Allen Owings / LSU AgCenter

Mowers and string trimmers that use a monofilament line for cutting down weeds and grass can be very damaging to young trees. Young trees have relatively thin bark. If the line is allowed to hit the trunk part of the bark will be removed with east contact of the line.

If you are not careful, you might even remove an entire ring of bark all the way around the trunk, girdling the tree. Mowers pushed hard or dragged around the base of young trees can be almost as damaging.

Tips For Your Lawn In The Autumn

Sep 21, 2018
LSU AgCenter

In October, the growth of warm season grasses like Saint Augustine, Bermuda, Centipede, and Zoysia begin to slow down. Now is a bad time to do things that disrupt the turf, such as filling, aerification, or thatching.

By mid-December, most warm season grasses will be dormant to some extent. Dormancy is important for the survival of grasses when they could be exposed to freezes. This would be a bad time to apply fertilizers high in nitrotgen. Nitrogen will stimulate lucious fall growth, which would make the grass susceptible to cold injury in the winter.

Virginia Buttonweed Is A Summer Problem

Aug 17, 2018
LSU AgCenter

Virginia buttonweed is one of the worst summer weeds infesting Louisiana turf grasses. The spread of this week has increased tremendously over the past few years.

Virginia buttonweed thrives on wet to moist soils and is highly drought tolerant as well. It has prostrate growing habit and forms dense mats that smother our lawns. It's easily identified by its opposite leaf arrangement and white flowers with a four-star shaped pedal. Sometimes the flowers can have a pink streak through the center of the two sepals.

Insects In The Lawn Cause Summer Problems

Jun 23, 2018
LSU AgCenter

Mid-summer marks the time to scout for insects in the lawn. You might not notice them until it's too late and the insects have caused damage to your turf.

Grubs and mole crickets are two subterranian creatures who can feed on turf grass roots. Above-ground insects to watch for include chinch bugs and the sod webworm.

Root Rot May Cause Brown Patches In Your Lawn

Mar 31, 2018
Don Ferrin / LSU AgCenter

Have you looked around your lawn recently? Have you noticed yellow or brown patches that are beginning to spread and get larger?

If so you may have a disease in your lawn called take-all root rot. It's caused by a soil-borne fungus which is typically found around turf grass roots.

Your Brown Winter Lawn

Jan 28, 2018
LSU AgCenter

By now, the snow has completely thawed and I'll suspect your lawn is a little bit browner now. Don't worry. There's no reason to be distressed about your dormant lawn; it's supposed to be like that. The lawn is just dormant. But now is a good time to plan your strategy for your nice green lawn in summer.

LSU AgCenter

The cooler weather we've been hoping for is finally here, and the forecast indicates it's here to stay.

This season's welcoming temperatures encourage specific lawn diseases and weeds. Large patch is a prevalent lawn disease this time of year. Large patch loves cooler nights and warmer days. Optimum conditions for this disease involve temperatures between 65 and 75 degrees at night and temperatures not above 85 to 96 degrees in the day.


Dan Gill / LSU AgCenter

One could argue October to be the most critical month for lawn maintenance. Work you put in now may not show immediate results, but that work will create a healthier lawn in the spring and summer to come.

This is the time of year summer weeds begin to finish up for the season. Simultaneously, winter weeds are beginning to emerge.


LSU AgCenter

Mid-summer marks the time when we need to begin scouting for insects in the lawn.

Two below-ground insects that can pose a problem to lawns in the summer are grubs and mole crickets. Above ground insects to watch for include chinch bugs and the sod web worm.


How to cover your bare spots with sod

Jun 10, 2017
LSU AgCenter

If you have bare spots in your lawn, June is still an acceptable time to lay sod. Leaving bare areas unattended in your lawn will lead to additional weed problems later in the growing season.

Large areas with no competition from gress are perfect for weeds. If your bare areas are too large, you might consider sod.


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