early childhood education

PIXABAY LICENSE

Lawmakers and the governor entered the legislative session agreeing the state should raise teacher salaries and increase education spending. But it took the Legislature all session to determine exactly how much more money to spend and where to send it. 

Wallis Watkins

A bill to legalize betting on professional and college sports in Louisiana casinos started advancing in the Senate Tuesday.

“It’s not a big money maker, but if we don’t do it, it puts us at a distinct disadvantage,” Senator Danny Martiny (R-Metairie) told members of a Senate judiciary committee.

Wallis Watkins

When it comes to approving a teacher pay raise, lawmakers appear to be on the same page. But how to fund other areas of education, that’s where Republican legislators seem to split with Governor John Bel Edwards.

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Included in Governor John Bel Edwards’ budget proposal for next fiscal year is a fully funded TOPS scholarship program, an increase to higher education, and a $1,000 teacher pay raise. Left out is any additional money for early childhood education, a program whose funding could end up being a point of contention during the legislative session that starts in April.

A state board of education commission is asking the Louisiana state legislature to expand access to early childhood education to more than 100,000 children in need at a cost of more than $800 million over 10 years.

Got $80-Million?

Dec 21, 2015
Sue Lincoln

The Louisiana Legislature’s education committees met jointly last week to discuss distribution from the state’s Education Excellence Fund.

“The Education Excellence Fund is a component of the Tobacco Settlement Funds, which is available to provide funds for local school districts, for state-authorized charter schools, and for state-approved non-public schools,” Erin Bendily, assistant superintendent with the state Department of Education, explained. She said $53-million is being divvied out of the fund this year.

Senate Education Chairman Conrad Appel had questions about the portion going to pre-K programs.

Little children are big news this week, as the White House holds a summit on early childhood education on Wednesday. The president wants every 4-year-old to go to preschool, but the new Congress is unlikely to foot that bill.

Since last year, more than 30 states have expanded access to preschool. But there's still a lack of evidence about exactly what kinds of interventions are most effective in those crucial early years.

Public preschool enrollment fell slightly last year, according to a report released today by researchers at Rutgers University.

About 9,000 fewer children attended public pre-K programs in 2013 than in 2012, the report from the university's National Institute for Early Education Research says. It's the first time since researchers began examining this issue in 2002 that the numbers have fallen.

It's a Wednesday morning at the Eliot K-8 Innovation School. Teacher Jodi Doyle is working with a small group of preschool students interested in domes.

"What do you think the difference is between a dome and an arch?" she asks.

The lesson doesn't go exactly as planned. Doyle wants the kids to build their domes with wire, but she wants the children to come up with that idea themselves. The kids used wire several months ago for a related project, and she hopes they'll remember.

In the early 1990s, a team of researchers decided to follow about 40 volunteer families — some poor, some middle class, some rich — during the first three years of their new children's lives. Every month, the researchers recorded an hour of sound from the families' homes. Later in the lab, the team listened back and painstakingly tallied up the total number of words spoken in each household.

What they found came to be known as the "word gap."

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