flowers

LSU AgCenter

In many ways, having a plant produce a flower is our trophy as gardeners for doing such a good job in the care and maintenance of our landscape plans. But there is much more to a flower than the symbolism of success. To understand flower biology, you must understand the parts of a flower.

The main components are the sepals, the leaf-like structures under the flower itself; the pedals, the colored part of the flower, which contain the perfume and nectar glands, and are the part to which we're more attracted; and, lastly, the male and female parts of the flower, which are responsible for production of the seed.

Allen Owings / LSU AgCenter

A new cleome, Seniorita Rosalita, is a radical departure from the cleomes we have grown in the past.

The cleome, or spider flower, is a traditional summer annual grown in the south for generations. They are tall robust plants growing three to five feet tall with a hand-shaped leaf and a large heads of delicate flowers.

Dan Gill / LSU AgCenter

If you're interested in planting wildflowers in your garden, one of the best plants to put in the garden this time of the year is the native Louisiana iris.

Hybrids of this native species bloom in a rainbow of color with large, showy flowers on their long stems. While their beauty and reliability in the garden have made Louisiana irises increasingly popular around the world, they still have some obscurity in their own native Louisiana.

Mark Claesgens / LSU AgCenter

It's time to wake up and plant the roses. Roses are one of the most common gardening shrubs used throughout the world.

The Chinese have been growing these and breeding them for over five thousand years. This breeding practice has led to many, many new cultivars, interesting colors, flower habits, and shrub sizes and forms.

Dan Gill/LSU AgCenter

The blooms of a Japanese Magnolia are one of the most uplifting sights to see in winter. A blooming Japanese Magnolia is a horticultural groundhog, indicating winter is just about done for the year.

More often than not, when Japanese Magnolias bloom around town, it's fairly safe to say we are well on our way to springtime.

LSU AgCenter

Planting spring flowering bulbs now is critical for proper growth and development later on in spring. This applies to bulbs like tupis and hyacinths.

Allen Owings / LSU AgCenter

When azaleas are in full bloom early spring, you might think they're the most spectacular shrubs that could be incorporated into the garden. These charming shrubs are all the craze for two to three weeks of the year. Yet if an azalea planting is suggested during any of the other 50 weeks, many people scoff at the mention of a plant that is only green for the vast majority of the year.

LSU AgCenter

Perennial verbenas can provide a long season of color to your flower garden. Verbenas are low-growing plants with showy clusters of flowers in a variety of colors.

The best time of the year to plant the trailing verbena are October through November and February through March. These plants establish best in mild temperatures.


LSU AgCenter

Early February is an excellent time to prune repeat flowering roses. And now is the time to get this done if you haven't pruned them already.

Repeat flowering roses are those that bloom heavily in the spring and early summer, then intermittently through the summer, and heavy blooming again in October through early to mid December.

Roses are pruned for a variety of reasons. One of them is to stimulate new growth. Another reason is to control the size of the bush.


LSU AgCenter

Perennial verbenas provide color over a long season in the flower garden. These generally low-growing plants produce clusters of showy flowers in a wide variety of colors.

October through November, and again in February through March, are the best times of year for planting trailing verbenas into your flower gardens. They establish best during milder temperatures.

The Homestead Purpel Verbena has been declared a Fall 2015 Louisiana Super Plant by the LSU AgCenter.


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