Jessica Rosgaard

Hello!

About 40 people gathered Wednesday evening at a New Orleans Labor Union hall to coordinate voter registration outreach efforts, and to educate people on a ballot initiative this fall that could change Louisiana’s non-unanimous jury rule.

Jessica Rosgaard / WWNO

After months of deadlock, lawmakers have finally agreed on a solution to the fiscal cliff, avoiding major cuts to state services and bringing an early end to the third special session.

The legislature is in the final days of its special session - and lawmakers are still working to finalize budget and tax bills for the coming fiscal year. Capitol Access reporter Wallis Watkins and editor Jessica Rosgaard bring you up to speed on what you may have missed this week in the state capitol.

Wallis Watkins

In a matter of 24-hours, the Legislature appears to have gone from a standstill to full steam ahead.

Sarah Gamard / LSU Manship School News Service

Lawmakers were at work on the Memorial Day holiday to try and solve the looming budget crisis.

As part of a collaboration between WWNO and WRKF in Baton Rouge, we bring you the Capitol Access Recap - a weekly review of what happened in the state Legislature.

The Louisiana legislature has finished its first week of the regular session. Gov. John Bel Edwards laid out his legislative priorities in an address to the chamber on Monday. Edwards also appeared before the Senate Committee on Labor and Industrial Relations to support bills that would raise the state minimum wage and require state contractors to abide by the Equal Pay for Women Act.

Wallis Watkins / WRKF

The state Legislature is back at work today. Just one week after ending a rocky special session, Gov. John Bel Edwards used his State of the State address to urge lawmakers to work together and move forward.

Gov. John Bel Edwards toured flood damage in New Orleans Monday. Edwards and Mayor Mitch Landrieu spoke to business owners and residents in the Treme where cleanup is underway.

Windell Bean’s family has owned their home on St. Ann for 53 years. Other than Katrina, the house hasn’t flooded since 1978. That is until Saturday, when it took on 4 inches of water.

Since last August, the popularity of flood insurance has again surged in Louisiana, but the future of the debt-laden National Flood Insurance Program is uncertain. Since 2005, the program has racked up $24.6 billion in liability to the U.S. Treasury, mostly due to claims after Hurricane Katrina, Superstorm Sandy, and the Great Louisiana Flood of 2016. That’s just one way that Louisiana’s past is influencing the federal program’s future.

Pages