WRKF

runoff election

Louisiana Public Broadcasting

Five weeks separate the gubernatorial primary and runoff in the race for Louisiana governor and this week marks the halfway point. Primary voters whittled down the field to two candidates—Republican businessman Eddie Rispone and the incumbent, Democrat John Bel Edwards.

The top-three candidates met in televised debates three times ahead of the primary and a few more times in candidate forums around the state. But that hasn't been the case in the runoff.

On Wednesday, Edwards and Rispone will meet face-to-face in the first, and likely only, debate before voters head to the polls November 16th.

Pearson Cross, political science professor and the Associate Dean of the University of Louisiana, Lafayette College of Liberal Arts, previews the showdown.

What's Next in the Race for Louisiana Governor?

Oct 15, 2019
WRKF

Governor John Bel Edwards, a Democrat, and Republican businessman Eddie Rispone are headed to a November 16 runoff.

Edwards earned 47 percent of the votes cast in the primary-- 20 percentage points higher than Rispone. But when you factor in the votes cast for Abraham, the top two Republicans combined for 51 percent of the vote, signaling a tough road ahead for Edwards.

Here to talk about the results and what happens next is Robert Hogan, chairman of Louisiana State University's political science department.

Secretary of State: Voter Turnout Science Not Easy

Nov 13, 2015

Early voting for the November 21st runoff continues through Saturday, and Secretary of State Tom Schedler is not yet ready to predict whether voter turnout will exceed last month’s primary.

“You know, this science is not becoming any easier,” Schedler says, with a chuckle.

Turnout for the October 24th primary election was anything but amusing, at a dismal 38.5 percent.

“History would tell you, and data would tell you that we would be below 38-and-a-half percent,” Schedler says. “I think this time we’ll at least match that or maybe increase it, so goes along with everything else in politics today: it’s kind of going against the mainstream of what you would expect.”