Tulane University

For weeks, Tulane University has been in the midst of a massive testing initiative — screening every student, staff and faculty member for COVID-19 before allowing them to return to campus for the start of classes on Aug. 19.

Top male professors at Tulane University School of Medicine created a "long-standing hostile and discriminatory work environment" for the women physicians, researchers and staff  who worked there, according to a complaint filed in federal court by Tulane medical school professor and physician Dr. Lesley Saketkoo.

It’s been nearly 13 years since Hurricane Katrina decimated the city and its school system. And a lot has changed since then. Now the city is the first, large school district in the nation where nearly all students attend charter schools. But the reforms are controversial, and have left many wondering, did they work?

Researchers at the Education Research Alliance for New Orleans have released a new report showing Louisiana's black students and low-income students are more likely to be suspended than white and wealthier students. 

Medical Marijuana Bill Snuffed Out

May 1, 2014
Sue Lincoln


Louisiana’s legislature approved medical marijuana for certain diseases in 1991. Twenty-three years later, a bill that would finally set up a prescription system for dispensing the drug was heard in Senate Health and Welfare Wednesday.

When Devon Walker returned to the Tulane University campus last week, he was greeted with kisses in the hallways. Students and faculty applauded him.

One year ago this weekend, in the second game of the football season, Walker, a team captain for Tulane, went in for a tackle and broke his neck. He was paralyzed from the shoulders down.

For months, he recovered far from home in two different hospitals. But now he's back in Louisiana and re-enrolling at Tulane, in New Orleans.

New Study Maps Out Risks to Early Childhood Development

Jan 9, 2013
WRKF

A unique study released last week by the LSU/Tulane Early Childhood Policy and Data Center uses maps to show where certain risk factors that could impede early childhood development are most prevalent across the state.

LSU Public Policy Research Lab Director Kirby Goidel and Epidemiologist Lina Brou said their study found that 55 of Louisiana’s 64 parishes have at least one high-risk factor that could impede childhood development such as high unemployment, high teen birth rate and high percentage of uninsured children. The nature of that risk was also found to differ from parish-to-parish.

Goidel said the initial step to addressing the needs of the children across Louisiana is to first understand the nature of the risk in each parish.