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trees

Don't Be Your Tree's Worst Enemy

Aug 9, 2019
Allen Owings / LSU AgCenter

Mowers and string trimmers that use a monofilament line for cutting down weeds and grass can be very damaging to young trees. Young trees have relatively thin bark. If the line is allowed to hit the trunk part of the bark will be removed with east contact of the line.

If you are not careful, you might even remove an entire ring of bark all the way around the trunk, girdling the tree. Mowers pushed hard or dragged around the base of young trees can be almost as damaging.

Peach Trees: Know Your Chilling Hours

May 7, 2019
LSU AgCenter

Have you ever eaten a peach? Like really eaten a fresh, local peach directly from the tree it was growing on? Home-grown peaches and grocery store peaches, in my mind, should be considered two different fruits. Peaches from the grocery store are dry and tasteless. A home-grown peach, either from the farmer's market or from your own backyard, is certainly one of the joys of life. Juicy, sweet, and fresh, there's nothing else that compares to a fresh peach.

Appreciating the Japanese Magnolia

Feb 9, 2019
LSU AgCenter

A blooming Japanese magnolia is a horticultural groundhog, indicating winter is just about done for the year. This plant is a hybrid, or a cross. The parent plants are difficult to find in local nurseries, but their offspring are stocked in abundunce as their blooms open.

Tom Pope

Many plants seem to save up all summer for the spectacular display of flowers, fruit, and foliage showing up in our gardens right now.

If you want punch up the color level in your garden from late spring through early December, here are some trees, shrubs, and perennials you might consider.

Spanish Moss Is Not Your Tree's Enemy

Aug 11, 2018
Raj Singh / LSU AgCenter

Spanish Moss is a flowering plant belonging to the bromeliad family, which makes it related to pineapples.

I get a lot of questions with concerns about Spanish moss damaging trees. Thankfully, Spanish Moss is not a parasite, contrary to what many believe. Spanish Moss is considered an epiphyte. That means it lives on the tree but is independent of the tree itself. Spanish Moss doesn't invaded the tree; it only uses the tree for structural support and doesn't get any nutrition from the tree. It doesn't invade the tree's living tissue, unlike mistletoe or other parasitic plants.

LSU AgCenter

It's hurricane season. It's time to look at the trees in your landscape. Do you see trees with large dead branches? Any completely dead trees? They should be pruned or removed. A sickly tree that is low in vigor or that is showing significant signs of decay or rotten areas in the trunk should be questioned, since it might be a threat in a wind storm.

Fig Trees In Louisiana Don't Need Pollination

Apr 15, 2018
Allen Owings / LSU AgCenter

The fig tree was imported into the United States some time during the 16th century. It grows well in the south Atlantic and Gulf coast areas. Figs are one of the most interesting fruits you can grow in your back yard.

The fig was one of the first fruits cultivated by ancient people. Evidence shows it's been in cultivation since 4,000 BC.

Dan Gill/LSU AgCenter

The blooms of a Japanese Magnolia are one of the most uplifting sights to see in winter. A blooming Japanese Magnolia is a horticultural groundhog, indicating winter is just about done for the year.

More often than not, when Japanese Magnolias bloom around town, it's fairly safe to say we are well on our way to springtime.

Shade tree benefits you didn't know

Oct 27, 2017
Dan Gill / LSU AgCenter

Medium to large shade trees provide benefits when you put them in your yard. These benefits inclue air purification, the removal of CO2 and other greenhouse gases from the air, and a moderation of the micro-climate in your yard and in your home.

Shade trees will keep home cooler in summer by blocking the heat of the sun and will keep home warmer in winter by blocking heat-sapping winds. But there's more.


Problems with the fall webworm

Aug 19, 2017
LSU AgCenter

You may have noticed webs being formed around the tips of the branches of pecan and sweet gum trees. You may have also noticed defoliation under the webbing on these trees.

This most likely indicates infestation of the fall webworm. In the south, the fall webworm uses deciduous hardwood trees and some evergreen trees as a host.


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