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tomatoes

LSU AgCenter

August is a transitional time for your vegetable garden. While cool-season planting begins in earnest next month, some of the more heat-tolerant cool-season vegetables, such as the cole crops, can be planted into the garden now. And, since our first frosts generally don't arrive until late November or early December, we can also plant warm-season vegetables such tomatoes, peppers, squash and cucumbers for fall production.

It is important to prepare beds properly before planting. Clear the site of all weeds or finished vegetable plants and incorporate generous amounts of compost into the soil. A general-purpose fertilizer may be applied. Gardeners should consider having their soil tested through their parish LSU AgCenter Extension office to learn more about the fertility of their soil and what fertilizer to use. A soil test will also tell you if you need to add lime to the soil.

Now Is The Time For Spring Tomatoes

Jun 3, 2019
LSU AgCenter

Now is the time to get tomatoes into the ground. Tomatoes are one of the most popular vegetables to grow in Louisiana. They require very little space when they're staked or tied and can produce up to five pounts of usable fruit per plant.

Choose a sunny spot to grow your tomatoes. These things want full sunlight all day. Tomato plants grow tall and spindly, setting few flowers, when they're grown in too much shade. Add as much organic matter as possible to the soil. Tomatoes want a fertile, well-drained soil with high organic matter. Fertilize your tomatoes; they're a heavy user of plant nutrients.

LSU AgCenter

May is one of the most improtant months for vegetable gardening. This month, we're harvesting vegetables, pulling out lingering cold crops, planting new transplants, and more. If you planted your early spring vegetables at the right time, you should be harvesting bell peppers, tomatoes, snap beans, and squash at the end of May. Cucumbers and irish potatoes should be coming soon.

Start Your Tomatoes and Peppers Indoors

Jan 29, 2019
LSU AgCenter

Your Louisiana Vegetable Planting Guide should be telling you that mid-January is the optiumum time to start your tomato and pepper seeds for transplants into the vegetable garden for mid-March. Whether you start those seeds in a greenhouse or indoors, there are many benefits to starting your seeds, including financial benefits.

Vegetables To Plant In September

Sep 7, 2018
LSU AgCenter

September is an odd month for planting the vegetable garden. It's right between the warm season and the cold season. What do we do?

This is a transition month. This is when we plant some warm season vegetables and some cool season vegetables.

In the early part of the month, we can plant transplants of tomatoes and peppers. We can also plant squash, cucumber, pole beans, snap beans from seed.

LSU AgCenter

Everyone loves to garden when the weather is perfect, but the summer sets apart the hardcore pros from the novices. There is still plenty to do in the gardens in late July.

Tasks you can do for your vegetable garden in July include harvesting, planting, planning, and amending the soil for late fall and early winter vegetables.


The many causes of your tomato problems

Jun 17, 2017
LSU Ag Center

Even the best of gardeners fall short of finding that perfect tomato fruit. Failure to set fruit can be caused by many different problems.


LSU AgCenter

Home vegetable gardening has become increasingly popular over past few years. We often see an increase in vegetable gardening when we have an economic downturn like the one we recently got through

Tomatoes remain the most popular of all the vegetables we grow in our gardens. And this makes a lot of sense seeing how tomatoes form an important part of Louisiana cooking and cuisine.

Vine-ripened, home-grown tomatoes have a quality to them that makes them far better than tomatoes you might find in a supermarket.

Preventing nematodes

Sep 16, 2016
LSU AgCenter

You may sometimes read or hear about planting certain plants around other plants to prevent insect problems. This is called companion planting.

The idea is certain plants will give off aromas that will repel insects. Unfortunately, research doesn't substantiate claims around companion planting.

LSU AgCenter

These days, gardeners mostly purchase vegetable transplants at local nurseries for their spring plantings. Wonderful transplants of vegetables like tomatoes, peppers, squash, and cucumbers.

But you know this limits you to just those cultivars the nursery chooses to carry. And this is really a small choice considering how many cultivars are out there. Look at any seed catalogue and you'll see exactly what I mean.

Raising your own transplants is not overly difficult and it is a fun and rewarding activity for home gardeners.


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