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The Mississippi River has been at flood stage for months. Levees and spillways keep most homes and businesses safe and dry from the flood waters, but the high water still creates headaches for levee districts and industries like oil and gas, and fisheries.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, WWNO coastal reporter Travis Lux went to find out how the river creates problems we can’t always see. WWNO’s Tegan Wendland got the details.

Trump Administration tariffs on things like steel and aluminum have been hard on ports across the country. But  officials at the Port of New Orleans say diversification has kept it in strong financial shape.

Admiral James Stavridis discusses the importance of safe travel on the oceans for the United States. Stavridis also addresses the tragic collision on the sea last week near Japan of a U.S. battleship and another ship.


On a cold, blustery day at Port Elizabeth in New Jersey, one of several massive cranes whirs along a rail high above the pier, picks up a heavy container from a ship's deck and loads it on a waiting truck back on land. The truck drives away, another arrives, and the whole process starts again.

It's a scene played out every day along America's coasts as massive container ships from across the globe pull into deep-water seaports, waiting to be unloaded. The ships are enormous — some 10 stories high and several football fields long.