protests

More than 100 protesters were gathered in front of the Orleans Parish Civil District Court on Thursday, blocking the Loyola Avenue and breezeway entrances, chanting phrases of resistance like, “The people united will never be defeated!” and awaiting the signal — a shout of “Hands up!” that means someone, possibly a lawyer or landlord is trying to enter the courts.

By now we’ve heard time and time again how the moment we’re all living through is historic, anxious and unprecedented. A global pandemic has killed hundreds of thousands, wrecked the global economy, and created record unemployment. Anti-racism protests have mobilized millions of people around the world calling for major reforms to policing and public policy. It’s changed the way many of us live, work and think.

Action continues in New Orleans and Baton Rouge this week with rallies for racial justice, sanitation workers' rights, mutual aid and more. 

One of this week's actions includes a crawfish boil.

The world erupted after the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis on Memorial Day. In New Orleans, activists have been holding rallies calling for police accountability and criminal justice reform in the weeks since then.

New Orleans Public Radio has been covering those rallies, and we talked to some New Orleans residents about why they’re out protesting — and their hopes for the future.

Advocates for police reform held a public meeting tonight in front of Jackson Square to articulate their demands ahead of Thursday’s New Orleans City Council meeting.

 

As cities across the nation grapple with their response to mass uprisings following the police killing of George Floyd, advocates and organizers in New Orleans continue to take to the streets this week to demand policy reform.

George Floyd’s killing by a white police officer in Minneapolis on Memorial Day has done more than spark a tidal wave of anti-racism and anti-police violence protests across the country and the world — protests that have yet to quell. It’s also prompted a national reckoning with racism in all its forms.

In Louisana, that’s meant calls to rename buildings and streets and investigate policing practices. We’ve got eyes on all of it, and we’ll keep track of the progress (or lack thereof) here.

The New Orleans Police Department released edited video from officer body cameras of the events on the Crescent City Connection last week during a press conference Wednesday afternoon.

Superintendent Shaun Ferguson again defended the use of tear gas and rubber pellets to use to disperse protesters on the bridge, calling them “less than lethal tools.” 

On the eighth consecutive day of protests in New Orleans in response to the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, thousands of people filled Decatur Street and the blocks around Jackson Square.

A day after protesters squared off with the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) on the Crescent City Connection, an incident that ended with officers tear-gassing them, demonstrators held a peaceful protest Thursday night without incident.

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