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In 1979, Ernest "Dutch" Morial became the first black mayor of New Orleans. He won the election with 95% of the black vote, and just 20% of the white vote. He campaigned on a platform of police reform, but it wasn’t just Dutch who wanted to re-organize the NOPD – they were organizing themselves. They wanted a union, pay increases, and better working conditions. Soon after Dutch took office, the police wasted no time. They staged their first strike, in history. Their bargaining tool? Mardi Gras.

Dennis Slocumb of the International Union of Police Associations reacts to the firing of BR Police Officer Blane Salamoni, who fired six shots that took the life of Alton Sterling. Baseball Legend Denny McLain on the 50th anniversary of his 31-6 season and the first week of Major League action. Author Kim Brophey on the importance of dogs in the lives of Americans.

“Just Follow the Instructions of the Officer”

Jun 28, 2017
courtesy: USDOJ

“You may disagree with who Alton Sterling was as a person, but look at his children. There’s five children that have to be taken care of for the rest of their life – five!” attorney Chris Stewart said, after filing a wrongful death suit on behalf of Sterling's children.


Photo illustration of an arrest by law enforcement utilizing handcuffs.
ice.gov

Former Baton Rouge police chief Jeff LeDuff comments on the mood of the community two days after the U.S. Justice Department decision not to press federal civil rights charges against two Baton Rouge police officers in the death of Alton Sterling.


Task Force Evaluates Police Body Cameras

Dec 10, 2015

For two years now, police officers in the city of Ville Platte have been wearing body cameras.  “I use to have lawsuits across my desk every month.  Once a month it was a lawsuit because of he-said, she-said," says Ville Platte Mayor Jennifer Vidrine.  But since the city implemented body cameras, Vidrine says those lawsuits have gone down by ninety percent.


This week in Washington, thousands of sworn officers gathered for National Police Week, an annual commemoration of the lives of officers who've died on the job.

This year it was hard for participants to escape the shadow of the anti-police protests of the past nine months. One of the week's events, a memorial bicycle ride, even was rerouted away from Baltimore, to make sure the nearly 2,000 officers participating in the ride wouldn't become targets.

Since the Ferguson, Mo., shooting, there have been renewed calls for police departments to hire more minority officers, but it turns out it's not that simple.

Police in the U.S. are more diverse than they were a generation ago. In the 1980s, 1 in 6 officers belonged to an ethnic or racial minority. Now it's about 1 in 4. The challenge these days is finding enough recruits to keep that trend going.

You Love Pinterest. Find Out Why The Police Do, Too

May 5, 2014

Plenty of people use Pinterest to find things — purses, posh hotels, eggplant parm recipes — but the rightful owner of a charm bracelet stolen 30 years ago? Leave that to the police.

In February, when an officer in Redwood City, Calif., discovered bags of stolen jewelry in the trunk of a car during a routine traffic stop, Detective Dave Stahler turned to social media — in hopes of tracking down the owner of a charm bracelet stamped with names and dates.