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HIV/AIDS

Wallis Watkins

In his State of the Union address earlier this year, President Trump announced plans to eliminate the spread of new HIV cases in the U.S. by 2030. The initiative will focus on 48 areas across the country seeing the majority of new HIV cases, including East Baton Rouge and Orleans parishes.

The first round of funding was recently announced and sends $1.5 million to East Baton Rouge Parish.

On this week's Capitol Access, Dr. Alexander Billioux, Assistant Secretary of Louisiana's Office of Public Health, talks about what the investment could mean for HIV care in the state. 

In his State of the Union address last week, President Trump announced a plan to eliminate the spread of new HIV cases in the U.S. by 2030.  The initiative could propel efforts already underway in Louisiana to prevent and treat the virus.

Baton Rouge Clinic Pilots New HIV Treatment Model

Jan 16, 2019

When you're diagnosed with HIV, it can feel like your fate has been written. You have questions, such as whether you’ll live, how much treatment will cost and whether people will still love you.

Tryfon Boukouvidis / LSU Manship School News Service

A House committee voted Wednesday to reconstitute a commission that is trying to slow the spread of HIV, which affects nearly 22,000 Louisiana residents. Overall, Louisiana had the second highest rate in the nation of AIDS cases per 100,000 people, after the District of Columbia, and the third highest rate of HIV infections, after the District of Columbia and Georgia.

Monica Johnson and Linda Meredith of the organization HEROES (Helping Everyone Receive Ongoing Effective Support) address the HIV-AIDS crisis in Louisiana.

Johnson and Meredity comment on a study examining New Orleans and Baton Rouge and the rural region in northeast Louisiana.


David Poole, Director of the Southern Bureau of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, addresses Baton Rouge ranking in the top five cities in HIV and AIDS rates.


In Rural Alabama, Fighting HIV With A Game

Dec 3, 2014

HIV was once considered an urban problem. Now, parts of the rural South — where the stigma is strong but health resources and education are not – has some of the highest rates in the nation.

HIV is sexist.

A woman is twice as likely to catch the virus from an infected partner in a heterosexual relationship than a man is.

And homosexual men are at even greater risk. They're more than 20 times as likely to get infected from an HIV-positive partner than partners in a heterosexual relationship.

Now scientists at Microsoft Research and the Zambia-Emory HIV Project have a clue about why these disparities exist.

Four Florida insurers allegedly discriminate against people with HIV/AIDS by structuring their prescription drug benefits so that patients are discouraged from enrolling, according to a complaint filed by health advocacy groups.

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