George Floyd

The world erupted after the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis on Memorial Day. In New Orleans, activists have been holding rallies calling for police accountability and criminal justice reform in the weeks since then.

New Orleans Public Radio has been covering those rallies, and we talked to some New Orleans residents about why they’re out protesting — and their hopes for the future.

Advocates for police reform held a public meeting tonight in front of Jackson Square to articulate their demands ahead of Thursday’s New Orleans City Council meeting.

 

As cities across the nation grapple with their response to mass uprisings following the police killing of George Floyd, advocates and organizers in New Orleans continue to take to the streets this week to demand policy reform.

George Floyd’s killing by a white police officer in Minneapolis on Memorial Day has done more than spark a tidal wave of anti-racism and anti-police violence protests across the country and the world — protests that have yet to quell. It’s also prompted a national reckoning with racism in all its forms.

In Louisana, that’s meant calls to rename buildings and streets and investigate policing practices. We’ve got eyes on all of it, and we’ll keep track of the progress (or lack thereof) here.

The New Orleans Police Department released edited video from officer body cameras of the events on the Crescent City Connection last week during a press conference Wednesday afternoon.

Superintendent Shaun Ferguson again defended the use of tear gas and rubber pellets to use to disperse protesters on the bridge, calling them “less than lethal tools.” 

On the eighth consecutive day of protests in New Orleans in response to the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, thousands of people filled Decatur Street and the blocks around Jackson Square.

A day after protesters squared off with the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) on the Crescent City Connection, an incident that ended with officers tear-gassing them, demonstrators held a peaceful protest Thursday night without incident.

New Orleans Police Superintendent Shaun Ferguson said police made every effort to avoid conflict with protestors who were attempting to cross the Crescent City Connection on Wednesday night. At a Thursday press conference, he showed reporters two videos that he said prove that officers deployed tear gas as a last resort.

New Orleans police launched tear gas on a crowd of protesters near the top of the Crescent City Connection late Wednesday night.

On Wednesday, Gov. John Bel Edwards praised protesters and law enforcement officers across the state for avoiding the violent altercations that have marked demonstrations elsewhere in the country. 

Thousands of Louisianans have taken to the streets to protest the police killing of George Floyd. Floyd, a black man, died of asphyxiation after a white Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck for several minutes.

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