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flooding

Wallis Watkins / WWNO

Over a third of the public schools in Livingston Parish were damaged by the flooding in Southeast Louisiana last August. While some of those schools have been repaired, others still haven't been able to reopen - like Southside Junior High School, where classes began this new year at a new site - for now. 


Louisiana is set to receive $1.2 billion in recovery money as a result of the August flooding.

On Friday, Governor John Bel Edwards presented a plan that would predominately direct that $1.2 billion--approved by Congress in December--towards housing recovery, the state’s biggest need following the flood.

courtesy: Louisiana Wildlife Federation

Recent partisan criticism of the time it’s taken for the governor’s office to get a flood recovery plan in place has been duly noted, and is being answered today.


Sue Lincoln

Louisiana’s congressional delegation has three new members, all Republican. Congressmen Mike Johnson (R-Bossier City) and Clay Higgins (R-Opelousas) and Senator John Kennedy (R-Madisonville) were sworn into office Tuesday in Washington. 


Mental Health, Post-Disaster

Dec 23, 2016

Beyond the tangible needs - like housing, and infrastructure - there’s a mental health component to disaster recovery. Traumatic experiences carry an emotional and psychological cost, and many victims continue to struggle long after their homes have been rebuilt.

But as WWNO’s Della Hasselle reports, local charities are available - providing counseling and assistance to help people rebuild their lives, and emerge from trauma stronger.

Singing the Year Away

Dec 23, 2016
media commons

2016 was the year that kept on giving -- giving all of us in Louisiana some real grief. Yet rather than bring you down with the usual “year in review”, here’s a way to laugh -- about my singing, at least. So, with apologies to the composer of “12 Days of Christmas”, here it is:


The Louisiana Office of Community Development has wrapped up a series of seven meetings in flood-affected regions of the state. The meetings offered residents an opportunity to learn about allocation plans for the initial $438 million installment of federal flood recovery funding. At a meeting in Baton Rouge many attended hoping they'd find help, but left disappointed.

Thousands of Louisiana flood victims are still living in hotels as part of FEMAs Temporary Shelter Assistance program.

On the list of FEMA relief options, the hotel vouchers are meant as a short-term solution -- but four months later, it's still the only option for many people who can't return home.

Community meetings are scheduled in seven parishes across Louisiana through December 20th.

Residents will have an opportunity to review proposed flood recovery programs, and talk to officials in charge of coordinating the recovery efforts.

Hosted by the Louisiana Office of Community Development, the meetings are part of a public comment period for the state’s action plan, which includes assistance programs for homeowners, renters, and small businesses.

Public meetings are scheduled as follows:

“What Would Happen If We ‘Cajunized’ It?

Dec 13, 2016
Sue Lincoln

Congressman Garret Graves of Louisiana’s 6th District is frustrated with the pace of flood recovery.

“Government has a fundamental customer service problem,” he told the Baton Rouge Press Club Monday. “What would happen if we ‘Cajunized’ it?”


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