WRKF

flooding

Gov. John Bel Edwards toured flood damage in New Orleans Monday. Edwards and Mayor Mitch Landrieu spoke to business owners and residents in the Treme where cleanup is underway.

Windell Bean’s family has owned their home on St. Ann for 53 years. Other than Katrina, the house hasn’t flooded since 1978. That is until Saturday, when it took on 4 inches of water.

Iris in a rain garden.
LSU AgCenter

Here in Baton Rouge, we have received a teremendous amount of rainfall these past few weeks. You could consider it excessive. But, technically, how much is excessive rainfall and how should it be dealt with?

Frequent rainfall over very long extended period of time, such as one and a half inches of rain every other day for twenty days, could be considered excessive. To the contrary, one single heavy rain event, say five inches in one day, would not be considered excessive rainfall.


Lawsuits Allege Interstate 12 Exacerbated August Floods

Apr 26, 2017

In August, residents of southeast Louisiana were left stunned when water destroyed towns during a so-called 1,000 year rain. The National Weather Service said the flooding was triggered by a slow-moving, low-pressure weather system that dumped as much as two feet of rain over a matter of days. But as Della Hasselle reports, others say some of the damage could have been prevented, and that one highway in particular is to blame.

LRN

Reporter Della Hasselle touches on concerns that some of the destruction from the historic flooding of 2016 could have been prevented and that one interstate highway is to blame.


Grilling the Governor on Flood Response

Apr 6, 2017
screen capture from C-SPAN broadcast

“Prior to and throughout the response to the 2016 floods, FEMA was a very good partner. But the transition from response to recovery is where challenges arose,” Governor John Bel Edwards told the U.S. House Oversight Committee on Flood Recovery and Governmental Affairs. He testified Wednesday in response to complaints about the pace of the recovery from August’s devastating floods across south Louisiana.


Governor John Bel Edwards is traveling to Washington, D.C. - his sixth trip since the August flooding in Louisiana. He’ll be meeting with lawmakers to request an additional $2 billion in flood relief.

So far, Congress has approved two installments of funding for the state at a total of $1.6 billion. But Governor Edwards says that is still short of what’s needed.

Last week, the Governor sent letters to both the Louisiana Congressional Delegation and President Trump describing the unmet needs of homeowners, renters and businesses.

Business Recovery In Baton Rouge After The Floods

Feb 6, 2017

Most of Louisiana’s $1.6 billion dollars in federal flood recovery money has been dedicated to homeowners. But thousands of businesses also need financial help if they’re going to recover. According to the National Flood Insurance Program 40-percent of flooded business never reopen. Karen Henderson from WRKF looks at how Baton Rouge area businesses are recovering, nearly six months after the devastating flood.

Diverting Future Floods (and Possibly Funds?)

Jan 26, 2017
courtesy LA DOTD

After last August’s floods, many claimed the Comite River Diversion Canal would have prevented much of the damage.

“Most people would not have flooded, but this traumatic event happened because of ineffectiveness,” says Denham Springs Representative Valarie Hodges.


As part of our ongoing reporting on flood recovery in Louisiana, Betsy Shepherd set out to tell the story of Guidry Brangus Ranch, a family-owned cattle farm in rural Vermilion Parish. Struggling to recover after being submerged by floodwater last August, Shannon Guidry planned to sell his farm. But just a few weeks after the interview, another tragedy struck - and this agriculture recovery story took a turn that no one could have imagined.

The federal government has already allocated $1.6 billion to Louisiana to aid in recovery from the August flood. Today, the Restore Louisiana Task Force approved the Governor’s plan on how to spend it. 

A large majority of the federal recovery money -- $1.3 billion -- will be spent on home repairs.

The focus is on over 36-thousand homes that took on major damage and were not covered by flood insurance.

Pages