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education

A bill meant to shield schools from civil lawsuits related to COVID-19 is now on its way to Gov. John Bel Edwards for final approval, but late changes made by a conference committee raised concerns on the House floor and almost killed the legislation.

Schools should expect some students and staff to become infected with COVID-19 this coming school year. That’s according to joint guidance released Thursday by state health and education agencies.

Most colleges and universities have released tentative plans for in-person learning this fall. But there’s a catch: Many require Louisiana to be in Phase 3 and Gov. John Bel Edwards just extended Phase 2 for an additional 28 days.

As school systems continue to weigh their options for the fall, a new bill may help provide schools with increased legal protection and encourage some to resume in-person learning despite the associated risks.

By now we’ve heard time and time again how the moment we’re all living through is historic, anxious and unprecedented. A global pandemic has killed hundreds of thousands, wrecked the global economy, and created record unemployment. Anti-racism protests have mobilized millions of people around the world calling for major reforms to policing and public policy. It’s changed the way many of us live, work and think.

For years, activist group Take ’Em Down Nola has been calling for the removal of all symbols of white supremacy in the city of New Orleans. And last weekend, another monument came crashing down.

*Updated 2:00 p.m. Friday June 12, 2020

Congress gave Louisiana more than $170 million last month through an emergency program meant to feed kids who usually receive free meals at school. But with the deadline for enrollment less than a week away, only about 60 percent of eligible children were enrolled.

New Orleans public schools officials have warned that the district may face multiple years of deficits due to COVID-19. But despite fears for the future, school officials say there will be no significant cuts to next year’s general fund budget in an effort to provide schools some stability.

Matthew Tuttle, a fifth grade teacher at Morris Jeff Community School, has mixed feelings about his experience leading virtual classes over the past few months, since the coronavirus forced the closure of public schools across the state.

New Orleans’ child care industry was in poor health long before the coronavirus hit.

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