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education

Aurianna Cordero / LSU Reveille

Today, we're taking a look back at the year in Louisiana politics.

In 2019, we saw some things change and others stay the same.

Democrat John Bel Edwards earned another four years in the governor's mansion, but it was a lonely victory. Republicans won every other statewide race and have unprecedented control in the House and Senate.

And there were some changes on this program as well. Wallis Watkins has left Capitol Access, but she was kind enough to come back and talk through some of the big stories of 2019.

One of the most important issues to many voters is education, and there are some key differences in how Democratic incumbent John Bel Edwards and his Republican challenger Eddie Rispone approach K-12 education.

There are a lot of subjects that are tough to teach, but one of the most difficult is the Holocaust. It’s an important historical event, but one that can be scary for students to hear about, and hard to understand. With a recent rise in hate crimes, activists say now especially, the history of the Holocaust and antisemitism is important for students to learn.

Echoes and Reflections creates middle and high school curriculum on the Holocaust. WWNO's education reporter Jess Clark attended their recent training at the National World War II Museum. Here are five ways to improve instruction.

The Louisiana Department of Education has just released a report on how quickly students are improving academically from year to year. It shows that, like last year, less than half of students are on track to master important math, reading and writing skills.

A state board of education commission is asking the Louisiana state legislature to expand access to early childhood education to more than 100,000 children in need at a cost of more than $800 million over 10 years.

It’s been nearly 13 years since Hurricane Katrina decimated the city and its school system. And a lot has changed since then. Now the city is the first, large school district in the nation where nearly all students attend charter schools. But the reforms are controversial, and have left many wondering, did they work?

On average, kids in Louisiana public schools tested slightly better on their standardized tests this year. But New Orleans-area kids still trail behind the state, and achievment gaps for certain groups of students remain persistent.

 

'You Have to Give Back': Honoring MLK

Jan 15, 2018
wikimedia commons

2018 marks 50 years since Dr. Martin Luther King was assassinated, but today we are honoring his life and work.

Louisiana is among 29 states spending less on students than before the Great Recession, according to a new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Researchers at the Education Research Alliance for New Orleans have released a new report showing Louisiana's black students and low-income students are more likely to be suspended than white and wealthier students. 

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