2016 Louisiana flood

Jessica Rosgaard / WWNO

Two years ago, tens of thousands of homes in southeast Louisiana were flooded by historic rainfall. Recovery continues, but fewer homeowners than anticipated are applying for financial assistance from the state. Capitol Access caught up with Pat Forbes, Executive Director of the Louisiana Office of Community Development, to discuss what’s been done and what’s left to do.

Jessica Rosgaard/WWNO

Louisiana’s Congressional delegation is working to reform laws to help victims recover from natural disasters. 

Around the country, hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent to buy back individual homes from people who have flooded repeatedly. But buying out a whole neighborhood is uncommon. Louisiana's 2016 flood seems to be changing that for two communities. In Pointe Coupee and Ascension Parishes, a buyout program first used in neighborhoods after Superstorm Sandy may offer a new option to homeowners who have lived with escalating risk for decades.

Wallis Watkins

Pat Forbes, Louisiana Office of Community Development Director, updated the Legislature’s Homeland Security Committee yesterday on recovery from the 2016 floods.

“We know that recovery - disaster recovery especially for homeowners - is never fast enough. We’re 14 months after the August flood,17 months after the March flood," explains Forbes.


C-SPAN

Congress has voted to give victims of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria some tax relief as they recover from the disastrous storms. But taxpayers in Louisiana who flooded in 2016 won’t get the same assistance.


Dietmar Rietschier is executive director of the Amite River Basin District. He talks about the historic flood of 2016.


Fighting the Flood: One Year Later

Aug 11, 2017
Kirsten Roed

It began one year ago tonight.

“I don’t ever remember going an entire day where it didn’t at least stop raining for a little while,” state climatologist Barry Keim said, wonderingly. “It rained all night long. It rained every minute of the day. We had 32 straight continuous hours of rainfall.”

Hardest hit was the Livingston Parish town of Watson, home to state Representative Valarie Hodges.

Work on National Flood Insurance Bill Continues

Aug 2, 2017
courtesy: Louisiana State Fire Marshal

“The National Flood Insurance Program is vital to Louisiana’s economy. It expires September 30th. We need to renew it.”

Louisiana's U.S. Senator John Kennedy is an intrinsic part of that effort.


Wallis Watkins

Just one week after school started last year, doors were closed as historic flooding damaged campuses across Livingston Parish. But when schools opened once again, not all students came back. And as Wallis Watkins reports, that’s only added to the financial strain on the school system. 

npr.org

Cindy has left Louisiana, but not without leaving some flooded roadways behind. DOTD Secretary Shawn Wilson says anyone travelling today would be wise to check 511la.org first.