Michael Weakens After Historic Slam Into Florida Panhandle

Updated at 5:30 a.m. ET Thursday Tropical Storm Michael is weakening as it churns across south-central Georgia. On Wednesday, Michael was the strongest hurricane to make landfall in the continental U.S. in more than a quarter-century, according to the National Hurricane Center . At least one person has died from complications related to the storm. Gadsden County, Fla., Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Anglie Hightower told NPR the man was killed after a tree fell through the roof of his home. In...

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U.S. Charges Alleged Chinese Government Spy With Stealing U.S. Trade Secrets

Updated at 4:55 p.m. ET The Justice Department unsealed charges Wednesday against a suspected Chinese spy for allegedly conducting economic espionage and trying to steal trade secrets from U.S. aerospace companies. The alleged Chinese intelligence officer, Yanjun Xu, was extradited to the United States on Tuesday from Belgium, where he was arrested in April at Washington's request. His extradition marks what appears to be the first time that a Chinese spy has been brought to the U.S. to face...

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Jindal Ready for Education Reform Fight

Jan 11, 2012

In his inaugural speech Monday, Governor Bobby Jindal made clear that he would be pushing for education reform to kick off his second term. But while Jindal went on at length about getting Louisiana’s students better opportunities, the speech was short on details for how he plans to do that.


Jindal Ready for Education Reform Fight

Jan 11, 2012

In his inaugural speech Monday, Governor Bobby Jindal made clear that he would be pushing for education reform to kick off his second term. But while Jindal went on at length about getting Louisiana’s students better opportunities, the speech was short on details for how he plans to do that.

When WRKF's Tegan Wendland asked LSU Professor Robert Hogan for his analysis, he suggested the governor was being purposely vague.

A Shantytown Music Box

Jan 6, 2012

A group of artists are filling New Orleans' Bywater neighborhood with an odd orchestra. They've created a whimsical village of fully interactive musical buildings on a vacant lot, and WRKF's Tegan Wendland went for a visit to see if houses really can make music.


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The Definitive Guide to the 2018 Midterms

A one-hour roundtable from the people of NPR's Politics Podcast